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  Psychogeographical Portrait
07
Paris,
Place des Abbesses

[Open Place du Abbessesin full screen]

   
             
  Place des Abbesses is
everything one might imagine
for charming and scenic Paris
square. It deserves special
attention from us urban
squares enthusiasts and
I'll try to show my respect.









































  01 - Best metro station entrance designed by Hector Guimard (1867–1942) and it is one of only three original Guimard entrances left in Paris.


02 - It is also hosting small carrousel full of happy kids.



03 - Our favourite sidewalk cafe Petit Montmartre


04 - Church of Saint-Jean-de-Montmartre is also located here. It is the first example of reinforced cement in church construction. Built from 1894 through 1904.


05 - The square Sehan Rictus, park connected to the Place des Abbesses, will offer you a place to get away.




06 - Even well known Paris closhards [modern word for them is homeless] are finding pleasant spot for themself here.


07 - Owner of the apartment we stayed nearby recommended us "Coquelicot" eatery just few steps from the square.




Richard Wallace decided in 1870 to make the Parisians benefit, with financing production and instalation of several models of fountains all over Paris.


  Place des Abbesses is everything one might imagine for charming and scenic Paris square.

It deserves special attention from us urban squares enthusiasts and I'll try to show my respect.

On the map bellow I marked some of the important spots where photos were taken and spot for the panorama itself. Best metro station entrance, sidewalk cafes, among them our favourite Petit Montmartre (03), hip eateries, bakeries, and the whole human parade to watch. Place to sit, drink coffee or vin rouge, read a good book, and pass the time of day in the most pleasant way.

It is also hosting small carrousel (02) full of happy kids.

Station's entrance (01) is designed by Hector Guimard (1867–1942) and it is one of only three original Guimard entrances left in Paris. Station itself is also unique, being on the Montmartre hill hill it is very deep and a main attraction is spiral staircase decorated with graffiti.

Artists are everywhere this one almost exclusively performing for us. Even larger version of the "Wallace" fountain, mentioned in more detail on one of the other squares in paris [link] is present.

Very unusual church of Saint-Jean-de-Montmartre (04) is also located here. It is the first example of reinforced cement in church construction. Built from 1894 through 1904, it was designed by architect Anatole de Baudot, a student of Viollet-le-Duc, well known among so called "in-vain-builders" [for exhample Bogdan Bogdanovic].

Construction was attended by skepticism over the properties of the new material. A lawsuit delayed construction, resulting in a demolition order that was not resolved until 1902, when construction was resumed.

The square Sehan Rictus is quite large park connected to the Place des Abbesses,that will offer you a green space to rest your eyes and to get away (05) from shops and enjoy romantic Paris.

Here you will find the famous wall "I love you", that is a huge blackboard dotted with 311 handwriting of "I love you" in 280 languages!

Even well known Paris closhards [modern word for them is homeless] are finding pleasant spot for themself here. (06)

Tip for visitors: Owner of the apartment we stayed nearby recommended us "Coquelicot" (07) eatery just few steps from the square. It is always extremely busy but it is worth trying. Small jazz band usually plays really nice music in front of it.

Nothing is missing, is it understandable now why this square scored a perfect 60 points?

One more curiosity of this attractive urban space is this fountain. This is one of the several models created by Charles-Auguste Lebourg, financed in 1870 by philanthropist Richard Wallace. They are placed in few cities around the world in great numbers and over time become symbols of Paris. They are associated by foreigners with the image of Paris, because it was in this city that they were first established and found most in France.

Among these philanthropists , Sir Richard Wallace is one of the most eclectic and discreet.

Having inherited from his father a great fortune in August 1870 , he Richard Wallace decided in 1870 to make the Parisians benefit, which earned him great popularity. He can be considered a philanthropist, in the true sense of the word. He also founded a hospital, took care of the victims of the bombings and the distribution of food to the population.

He remained faithful to his adopted nation, France, where he now rested in the Père-Lachaise cemetery .

But why fountains?

Following the siege of Paris and the Commune, many aqueducts were destroyed, and the price of water, already high, was considerably increased. Many poor people find it impossible to find them for free. Thus the temptation of the "wine merchants" is great among the indigent, and it is a moral duty to help them and not to plunge into drunkenness.

Even today, where water and sanitation are not a problem for the vast majority of Parisians, these fountains are often the only free water points for people like the homeless . Rich or poor, all passers-by can quench their thirst.

Much more info on Wikipedia.

 

 

 

 

 

 
             
   

On this map I marked some of the important spots where photos were taken and spot for the panorama itself.

Bellow is little les attractive but similar in lot of details Place du Marché Sainte Catherine, Paris.

 
       
 

Psychogeographical Portrait
07
Paris,
Place des Abbesses

[Open Place du Marché Sainte Catherine, Paris]

   
             
  01
Pedestrian Area, Beograd, Srbija
  04
Uzes, Around Place aux Herbes
  08
Street Art Walk, Buenos Aires
 
           
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Last time updated on June 15, 2017 21:30